Birds at Agara Lake. - A photo documentory.

9:27 AM

In this blog I tried to capture some of the birds at Agara lake. I had visited Agara lake once but planning to visit it again sometime in future.
All photos were taken with Canon 550D and EF 55-250mm lens. The clarity of the pictures are not that great.

[Information source: Wikipedia]

The black cormorant

The great cormorant (Phalacrocorax carbo), known as the great black cormorant across the Northern Hemisphere, the black cormorant in Australia, the large cormorant in India and the black shag further south in New Zealand, is a widespread member of the cormorant family of seabirds.[2] It breeds in much of the Old World and the Atlantic coast of North America.



Black kite

The black kite (Milvus migrans) is a medium-sized bird of prey in the family Accipitridae, which also includes many other diurnal raptors. It is thought to be the world's most abundant species of Accipitridae, although some populations have experienced dramatic declines or fluctuations.[2] Current global population estimates run up to 6 million individuals.[3] Unlike others of the group, black kites are opportunistic hunters and are more likely to scavenge. They spend a lot of time soaring and gliding in thermals in search of food. Their angled wing and distinctive forked tail make them easy to identify. This kite is widely distributed through the temperate and tropical parts of Eurasia and parts of Australasia and Oceania, with the temperate region populations tending to be migratory. Several subspecies are recognized and formerly had their own English names. The European populations are small, but the South Asian population is very large.




Egret

An egret /ˈɡrət/ is a bird that is any of several herons, most of which are white or buff, and several of which develop fine plumes (usually milky white) during the breeding season.


Great Blue Heron

The great blue heron (Ardea herodias) is a large wading bird in the heron family Ardeidae, common near the shores of open water and in wetlands over most ofNorth America and Central America as well as the Caribbean and the Galápagos Islands. It is a rare vagrant to Europe, with records from Spain, the Azores, England and the Netherlands. An all-white population found only in the Caribbean and southern Florida was once treated as a separate species and known as the great white heron.

Common myna
The common myna (Acridotheres tristis), sometimes spelled mynah, also sometimes known as "Indian myna",[2] is a member of the family Sturnidae (starlings and mynas) native to Asia. An omnivorous open woodland bird with a strong territorial instinct, the myna has adapted extremely well to urban environments.
The common myna is an important motif in Indian culture and appears both in Sanskrit and Prakrit literature. Myna is derived from the Hindi language mainā which itself is derived from Sanskrit madanā.[3][4]


Phesant tailed Jakana
The pheasant-tailed jacana (Hydrophasianus chirurgus) is a jacana in the monotypic genus Hydrophasianus. Jacanas are a group of waders in the family Jacanidaethat are identifiable by their huge feet and claws which enable them to walk on floating vegetation in shallow lakes, their preferred habitat. The pheasant-tailed jacana is capable of swimming, although it usually walks on the vegetation. The females are more colourful than the males and are polyandrous.
For the origin and pronunciation of the name, see Jacana.



Purple Swamphen

The purple swamphen (Porphyrio porphyrio) is a "swamp hen" in the rail family Rallidae. Also known locally as the pūkekoAfrican purple swamphenpurple moorhenpurple gallinule or purple coot. From its French name talève sultane, it is also known as the sultana bird. This chicken-sized bird, with its large feet, bright plumage and red bill and frontal shield is easily recognisable in its native range.



Tickell's Blue Flycatcher
Tickell's blue flycatcher (Cyornis tickelliae) is a small passerine bird in the flycatcher family. This is an insectivorous species which breeds in tropical Asia, from theIndian Subcontinent eastwards to Southeast Asia. Its range stretches across all the countries from India to Indonesia. They are blue on the upperparts and the throat and breast are rufous. They are found in dense scrub to forest habitats.
The name commemorates the British ornithologist Samuel Tickell who collected in India and Burma


White throated Kingfisher
The white-throated kingfisher (Halcyon smyrnensis) also known as the white-breasted kingfisher or Smyrna kingfisher, is a tree kingfisher,[2] widely distributed inEurasia from Bulgaria,[3] TurkeyWest Asia east through the Indian subcontinent to the Philippines. This kingfisher is a resident over much of its range, although some populations may make short distance movements. It can often be found well away from water where it feeds on a wide range of prey that includes small reptiles, amphibians, crabs, small rodents and even birds. During the breeding season they call loudly in the mornings from prominent perches including the tops of buildings in urban areas or on wires.


White-breasted waterhen
The white-breasted waterhen (Amaurornis phoenicurus) is a waterbird of the rail and crake family Rallidae that is widely distributed across Southeast Asia and theIndian Subcontinent. They are dark slaty birds with a clean white face, breast and belly. They are somewhat bolder than most other rails and are often seen stepping slowly with their tail cocked upright in open marshes or even drains near busy roads. They are largely crepuscular in activity and during the breeding season, just after the first rains, make loud and repetitive croaking calls.


White browed wagtailThe white-browed wagtail or large pied wagtail (Motacilla maderaspatensis) is a medium-sized bird and is the largest member of the wagtail family. They are conspicuously patterned with black above and white below, a prominent white brow, shoulder stripe and outer tail feathers. They are common in small water bodies and have adapted to urban environments where they often nest on roof tops. The specific name is derived from the Indian city of Madras (now Chennai).

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3 comments

  1. Hey Ramnath,

    An excellent read. This is Subhrajit from www.adventureclicknblog.com and we would love to have your blogs listed in our website. We have also launched a credit system for contributions by which contributors can reimburse the points for cool travel stuffs (adventureclicknblog.com/moreblognearn.php). The credit points are a way of saying thank you for your sincere effort and time for writing.

    Regards,
    Subhrajit,
    Subhrajit.ghadei@gmail.com
    0091 8378997510
    Education: B.Tech (IIT Bombay) & MBA (IIM Lucknow)

    ReplyDelete
  2. Hi Ramnath,
    Thanks for this blog, this morning while I passed by the agara lake I found many white birds, guessing it's the waterhen now. Found it really nice that while I googled to check there was a blog about it!!
    Thanks,
    Agnes

    ReplyDelete
  3. Hey kamath, came to your blog after reading your quora answers. You have an amazing collection . Today I was at the agara lake. Your collection helped me spot them faster.
    Thank you.

    ReplyDelete

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